25 Interesting Expressions used in Brazil

25 IEUIBIntroducing my third ebook (PDF) for learning Brazilian Portuguese which, as the title says, includes 25 interesting expressions used in Brazil, as well as their origins. If you’re looking to come a little closer to your goal of being fluent, this will help you get there. According to the introduction inside,

“This e-book is for anyone with an interest in Brazilian Portuguese and gaining knowledge that would be considered pretty common within Brazil. The phrases and expressions, being idiomatic, aren’t used every day, nor should they be, but they are interesting to know, fun to use, and useful to keep in your linguistic toolbox (and, of course, it makes you feel smart to recognize something seemingly nonsensical in another language).”

To purchase it, just click the Paypal image below (you don’t need an account, just a credit card), and I’ll send it to you by email!

Price: US $2.99

PayPal

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My other ebook links (Paypal)

150 Tricky Words – $4.99 USD

103 Tricky Verbs – $4.99 USD

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Two “Tricky” Ebooks – $9.99 USD

All Three Ebooks $12.98 USD

150 Tricky Words in Brazilian Portuguese ebook

150 TWBP cover

US$4.99
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After successfully launching my first ebook, 103 Tricky Verbs in Brazilian Portuguese right here on Eyes On Brazil, today, I’m announcing my second ebook (PDF), 150 Tricky Words in Brazilian Portuguese. It is based on content I created for this blog several years back, only I’ve reworked and improved it, in addition to having it edited by a native Brazilian Portuguese speaker.

Just like the first ebook, as a PDF, it can be viewed (via Apple’s iBooks app) on iOS devices as well as on Amazon’s Kindle devices (or any device or computer that allows for PDF viewing).

The ebook is aimed to make Brazilian Portuguese easier for those of you who are finding yourselves unsure of when to use one word over another. As the title states, there are (technically more than) 150 Tricky Words, spread out over 44 Word Sets (groupings of words that have similar meanings) which include example sentences and, in many cases, additional information on the word(s).

Here’s an actual Word Set you’ll learn about in my e-book:

Screen Shot 2013-07-11 at 9.03.32 AM

I’ll be selling 150 Tricky Words in Brazillian Portuguese using PayPal’s Online Invoicing, which allows you to pay with a credit or debit card on PayPal’s site (even without the need for a PayPal account). Click on the link(s) below the PayPal image and, once you’ve paid, PayPal will tell me so and then I’ll send you the ebook(s)!

150 Tricky Words – $4.99 USD

103 Tricky Verbs – $4.99 USD

25 Interesting Expressions – $2.99 USD

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Two “Tricky” Ebooks – $9.99 USD

All Three Ebooks $12.98 USD

103 Tricky Verbs in Brazilian Portuguese ebook

 

103 TVBP cover

US$4.99 ______

With Eyes On Brazil turning 5 years old, I’m really excited to introduce my first ebook (PDF), 103 Tricky Verbs in Brazilian Portuguese for sale, priced at US$4.99. It is based on content I created for this blog several years back, though I’ve reworked and improved it, in addition to having it edited by native Brazilian Portuguese speakers. As a PDF, it can be viewed (via Apple’s iBooks app) on iOS devices as well as on Amazon’s Kindle devices. The ebook is aimed to make Brazilian Portuguese easier for those of you who are finding yourselves unsure of when to use one verb over another. As the title states, there are 103 Tricky Verbs, spread out over 47 Verb Sets (groupings of verbs that have similar meanings) which include example sentences and, in many cases, additional information on the verb(s). The actual Verb Sets you’ll learn about in my e-book: Screen Shot 2013-05-26 at 11.50.49 AM After countless attempts, using various formats, to prep the ebook for the Amazon marketplace, I’ve decided instead to sell it using PayPal’s Online Invoicing, which allows you to pay with a credit or debit card on PayPal’s site (even without the need for a PayPal account). Click on the button below and, once you’ve paid, PayPal will tell me so and then I’ll send you the ebook!

 

 

Don’t forget to check out 150 Tricky Words in Brazilian Portuguese!

Moods – Vocabulary

I remember the first time I heard my carioca friend say “alto astral“, I thought to myself, “what in the world could that mean?” She tried to explain it to me in simple terms, saying “it’s-a like-e when you are in a good-a mood-je”. Apparently, one can be in a good mood (estar de alto astral), bad mood (baixo astral) or need their mood uplifted (levantar o astral).

A good question to raise is how does one’s ‘astral’ differ from their ‘humor‘ (bom humor/mau humor)? I assume there isn’t much of a difference.

“Apanhar” Takes a Beating

“Dictionaries do not always take note of the semantic extensions that the verb “apanhar” has acquired in Portuguese.

When walking on the street and going into a store in any Brazilian city, it’s hard not to hear enunciations every once in a while like “você vai apanhar!” (you are going to get hit!) or “você quer apanhar?” (do you want to get hit?), as they are frequently said loudly by parents and those responsible for small children whose behavior in public leaves a lot to be desired.

The verbal interaction between child and adult, in most instances, remains as a threat only because no one physically hits anyone, thankfully. Not even a slap! Until now, I never saw a child respond affirmatively to the question about if he or she wants to get hit or not! A real communicative skill sometimes is to remain in silence. The “question” functions as a threat that leads to nothing.” – Source (in PT)

My Take

At almost the same time that I was considering writing a post on the verb “apanhar”, I came across an article on the matter in the Brazilian magazine, Língua Portuguesa. I learned it is often said in jest or as the article above points out, as a mere threat. My ex-girlfriend, a paulistana, used to say it to me (in jest, of course!) and at the time I didn’t know what the word meant but I understood the gist. Using my Portuguese knowledge at the time, I decided it was or should be reflexive and would use it in such a manner (saying “vou te apanhar”), not realizing I was in effect ‘beating up’ the verb in my own way.

The verb has other meanings, which can be seen on Google Translate or in Portuguese at Wikcionário.

The Hypothetical – Curiosities

My Brazilian ex girlfriend used to start her ‘what if’ (hypothetical) questions with ‘E se‘ (And if) and while that’s just fine as she was speaking correctly in her own language, she would translate it into English and ask a ‘what if’ by starting with “And if…” which slightly amused me but only because I understood where she was coming from when she constructed the sentence.

Usually an example would come up while watching a movie, where she’d say “e se ele morreu?” and I would respond, “I don’t know, let’s just watch it,” because I’m annoying like that when watching a good film. In any event, the Portuguese hypothetical started to make sense as a way to get to the point, otherwise one would have to say something like “E o que aconteceria se…

On a side note, my German ex-girlfriend used to say ‘oder‘ at the end of some sentences and from my basic German, I knew that meant ‘or’, which meant in my English-speaking brain that she was speaking strangely. I started then to add ‘or’ to the end of some of my sentences in English to bother her…but I failed because she thought it was normal. Go figure! Later, I found out that the ‘oder‘ tag means ‘right?’

Camelô – Etymology

Camelô – Traveling Merchant

The origin of the word is the Arabic khamlat, a name that was given to the rustic commercialized fabrics sold in open-air markets and touted loudly by the merchants, the camelôs of the previous century. At this point, the verb cameloter (to sell trinkets) was popularized in France by the street sellers who chose high-traffic areas to sell their wares. It is the street salesman that sells his kitsch to bemused audiences. With their power of persuasion, many times these true artists, when victorious in their craft, become rich and turn into the owners of their empires. The Brazilian media magnant Sílvio Santos has said he will never forget the teeming Largo da Carioca in Rio de Janeiro where he began his vivid career. – Source (translated by me)

It is important to note that camelôs differ from ambulantes in that the former has a fixed location while the latter is ambulatory.

Telling Someone They Smell

Sometimes there are words that aren’t necessarily in the dictionary but they form part of the culture, so it’s good to know them too…even if they stink! Below, you’ll see quite a few words that you can use to speak of someone’s (bad) smell, with a few extras added in for good measure. Remember that you should use estar (com) with these words to express temporary situations.

Tá fedendo/podre – You stink!
Chulé – Smelly feet (which you might remember from this)
Bafo (or Mau hálito) – Bad breath
Ce-cê (from CC or cheiro de corpo) – Body odor* (aka, BO)

* – You can also say axila, catinga, fedor de suor or even sovaco. Also, the English equivelent of telling someone they have ‘dog breath’ is expressed in Portuguese as ‘bafo de onça‘ (jaguar breath).

A few others as extras so that I don’t have to do another post on this sort of subject! lol

Arrotar – To burp
Peidar – To ‘pass gas’/fart
Remela – Crusties or Eye boogers
Muco – Phlegm
Meleca – Booger

Portuguese Punctuation

Here is some basic punctuation in Portuguese, together with the names in English and the symbol that goes with them. There are always times when you need to express one of these and you have to find a round-about way of doing so.

Ampersand – E commercial (&)
Apostrophe – Apóstrofo ( ) ( )
At Sign – Arroba (@)
Brackets – Colchetes ( [ ] )
Braces/Curly Brackets – Chaves ( { } )
Colon – Dois pontos ( : )
Comma – Vírgula ( , )
Dash – Travessão ( )
Ellipsis – Reticências ( )
Exclamation mark – Ponto de exclamação (!)
Hyphen – Hífen ( )
Parenthesis – Parênteses ( ( ) )
Period – Ponto final*
Question mark – Ponto de interrogação (?)
Quotation marks – Aspas (”   “)
Semi-colon – Ponto-e-vírgula ( ; )
Slash – Barra ( / )
Underline – Traço inferior (_)

* – not to be confused with ‘período‘, which refers to time.

Being Alone (a depressing post)

- Alone, By Itself, Only or But

The word só can be expressed in a few ways. As an adjective, it can take on the meaning of ‘solitary, without company or social circle’ as well as ‘isolated, unique’ and even ‘without a partner, single’. As an adverb, it turns into an adverb of exclusion. I will give examples of each in the order I mentioned them. As an added mention, I will give an example of the usage of ‘but’, which is usually followed by the word ‘que‘.

Ex. Foi ficando um homem só entre os colegas.
Ex. There was only one man among the colleagues.

Ex. Era uma casa só naquele monte.
Ex. There was one house by itself on that mountain.

Ex. Uma mulher só é sempre mais livre.
Ex. A single woman is always more free.

Ex. Contava só com ele.
Ex. He was the only one to be counted on.

Ex. Eu quero, só que não posso.
Ex. I want to, but I can’t.

Sozinho - Alone, Unaccompanied, Abandoned or Without Anyone’s Help

Note the diminutive form (-zinho) of , which actually acts as an augmentation of aloneness.

Ex. Ele foi sozinho.
Ex. He went alone/by himself.

Ex. Ela conseguiu, sozinho, acabar a tarefa.
Ex. She managed, alone, to finish the task.

Sós – Plural of

With sós, the possibility exists to place an ‘a’ before the adjective (a sós), which gives it the meaning of sozinho (alone), yet still in its plural sense.

Sós
Ex. Estamos sós agora.
Ex. We are alone now or We are by ourselves now.

A sós
Ex. Estamos a sós agora.
Ex. We are alone now.

Expression

With the expression below, it is important to note that the English version employs “alone” while the Portuguese version (lit. ‘leave me in peace’) does not.

Me deixe em paz!
Leave me alone!