Bad Words vs. New Words

Starting with the bad words (I mean negative news), I give you another ‘latest news (I haven’t read)’ snapshot from Folha.

And then there’s the new words, which aren’t many. Pinga-pinga is the same as ônibus (bus), only it’s apparently the kind that always is stopping to pick up more passengers (source). Second, ‘Gre-Nal’, the nickname for matches between Grêmio and Sport Club International, both from Porto Alegre (source). Seemingly on par with a ‘Fla-Flu’ (Flamengo vs. Fluminense) match, though I’ve never been to a soccer game, so what do I know? For a second, I almost thought ‘Gre-Nal’ when spoken was grená (source), or a dark red color, but the context didn’t fit.

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4 thoughts on “Bad Words vs. New Words

  1. That’s interesting. I didn’t know about pinga-pinga. In fact, in Minas we usually say ônibus ‘parador’ (same meaning as pinga-pinga) or ‘cata jegue’ more used when you wanna joke with the fact that you use public transportation. Also we say ‘Vou para casa de GOL.’ (GOL is the most popular Volkswagen car in Brazil, but in this case it stands for ‘Grande Ônibus Lotado’. We say that in the same sense as ‘cata jegue’.

    • Yeah, I thought so too. I watched Antes Que o Mundo Acabe, a film about growing up in the interior near Porto Alegre and heard the ‘new words’ listed in my post. In the link for ‘pinga-pinga’, one person comments that there was an airline that stopped in about 5 Brazilian cities and it was called the ‘pinga-pinga’ flight, lol.

    • Oh, I wasn’t paying attention to phrases within the Folha image. When I say ‘bad words’, I mean negative news…probably should’ve been clearer about that. “Bater boca” I hadn’t heard but I guessed at its meaning and after looking it up, seems I more or less got it right (at least in it having a negative connotation). Apparently, it’s to argue or contest something.

      Also in the film I saw, which I mentioned in the reply to Jonas, the actors used “comer vento”, which I took to mean ‘to get some air’. That one, I liked.

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